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Tweendays

Thanksgiving Day is over,* and commercial Christmas is not yet upon us.

Today's PostNote:
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an opinion,
an observation,
or
a fact.

So, the tweendays are here! Black Friday, the first tweenday seems to be as celebrated as much as Thanksgiving or Christmas.

At least one vendor called the first Saturday after Thanksgiving Black Friday Extended. One said the Sunday after Thanksgiving was Additional Black Friday.

In the vein of lower than marked up prices on sale, why were they not designated Black Saturday and Black Sunday? Well, if that second tweenday is called Small Business Saturday, what commerce name has been given to the Sunday after Thanksgiving?

Then there is today – Cyber-Monday which will be followed by Giving-Tuesday.

I see USPS, UPS, and other shipping outfits have already identified ‘last day to ship’ to arrive on days. I’m sure media will announce those tweendays several times before…, – well you know.

I did not, did not, forget Buy-Nothing Day which is celebrated by some on Black Friday and others on Small Business Saturday!

My one or two minutes of research wasn’t helpful in finding RANT-DAY, so I’m assuming any tweenday or other day is permitted.**


*Only the annual celebration – we should be thankful for every day we get.
**If rant day is already designated somewhere by someone, I apologize for my plagiarism of the title.

Thanks

Today's PostNote:
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an opinion,
an observation,
or
a fact.

The song “Thanks for the Memory” won the Academy Award for Best Original Song, in the 1938 film The Big Broadcast of 1938 by Bob Hope and Shirley Ross, and became Hope’s signature tune.

So, what does Bob Hope and his song have to do with my thoughts about thanks?

Nothing!

What do the lyrics of the song have to do with my memories?

Nothing I remember at this time!

Unless I have notes, most of my octogenarian memories are triggered by current events or comments about past events.

So, on this 2022 Thanksgiving day, I’m most thankful my octogenarian memories can still be triggered by family and friends for whom I am always thankful.


Remember?

Aapologies to anyone who may have taken my last blog as a cut on people impacted by winter weather. The dig was intended for weather people who seem almost gleeful when a weather record or potential thereof is possible.

Today's PostNote:
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an opinion,
an observation,
or
a fact.

If you were, do you remember where you were this day in 1963?
We were at an on post theater in Frankfurt, Germany watching the movie The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.


Under the Sun

Today's PostNote:
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an opinion,
an observation,
or
a fact.

National weather forecasters/reporters are emphasizing winter weather just south and east of the Great Lakes like it is a new phenomenon.


Some of you may have read about one of my winter experiences, but “Under the Sun” is not the story I told in 2016.

About this time of year in 1956, I and two others were invited to spend Thanksgiving with a fellow soldier in the Finger Lakes Region of New York, Canandaigua to be more specific. But that wasn’t my first trip with Ron Brink, an MOS-286 school dropout, who became an Army Security Agency photographer. I went with him to his girlfriend’s family home several weekends.

His hometown claim to fame was his talent with music, so each of those weekends he had a gig at one of the local taverns. Had I been a drinker at the time, I could have all the beer or other drink I wanted at his shows. A friend of Ron’s, even still underage, paid for nothing. Well burgers and soft drinks were also part of the bennies.

Whoops, like I often get, I’m off my original topic again.

Daylight was fading and visibility was exacerbated by light falling snow when we were released after classes with long-weekend passes. A weather caution was posted at the company orderly room and as we headed west, the country music on Ron’s car radio was interrupted by weather information.

Being of the age of young men who know more than most, we continued the trip anyway. Ron and I had driven in snow many times and traded times behind the wheel during the 12-hour drive that would have been six in good weather. Neither of the other guys had driven in snow before and for one, it was the first time he’d experienced snow of any kind.

As expected by most, because of the weather, Thanksgiving dinner prepared for 20 by Ron’s girlfriend’s mother was attended by 10 including the four of us soldiers.

Ron had a gig scheduled for Friday after Thanksgiving. Town streets hadn’t been cleared so the five of us walked. Would you believe Ron’s girlfriend was the only one with boots and warm jacket? The gig at a tavern was only a little better attended than the dinner.

The tavern closed early and after we negotiated nearly knee deep snow, we decided to get an early start Saturday morning. Sometime during the night, the street was plowed leaving a berm across every driveway. The other two chipped and shoveled an opening in the berm while Ron chained one wheel and I did the other.

The six-hour return trip to Ft. Devens took only 14 hours.

Weatherwise, nothing is new under the sun – we just hear about it quicker these days.


Stuff

Today's PostNote:
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an opinion,
an observation,
or
a fact.

When is the last time you used that thing/stuff.


My favorite kept for years thing was the used only once 36mm special socket for removing my Volkswagen rear axle nut*. There might be others, but it comes to mind as I start this.

Yes! I’ve experienced ‘as soon as you get rid of it, you’ll need it.’ But I’m still over halfway through my octogenarianism without great harm for not keeping stuff.

About 20 years ago, I got rid of stuff I’d been keeping for unrememberable years in case I needed one of the elements of stuff for a project. We sold our house and hadn’t found a replacement, so most of our needed (and admittedly some unneeded) stuff went into storage.

Isn’t it amazing how much procrastination defining stuff we collect. You know: might need it, too good to toss, someone else could use it, etc. stuff fills our space until faced with the need to get something shelved behind it. Then there’s the question, “What did I put in that box?”

However, before that move, I eliminated a small truck load of fix it later stuff. I also sent other stuff in reasonable condition but had no definable future in my spare time ventures to people who might keep the stuff for the same reason.

Then the garage sale (tag sale to those of you on the east coast): People bargained for things or stuff they will save or use until they sell at their own sale. GS is many times followed by a trip to a second hand retail facility where one can get a tax deduction receipt, or not. I’ve never been concerned about the few cents difference it would make in my tax load.

After moving into our current home, I decided to have a garden. After giving the metal storage shed left behind by the previous owner to someone who thought they could use it, I had the space. Then I realized that I needed a ‘keep the critters out’ fence.

All of the material I needed was provided by someone who wanted to get rid of his fence. Of course, there was more material than I needed. But, I thought, or think I thought, I could use the rest later.

Last week, now nearly eighteen years later, the chain-link fencing material went to a Christian school fundraiser.


I still have stuff, but not so much.


*After being presented for sale at several garage sales, the afore mentioned socket was gifted to a guy who claimed to know a guy who was restoring a VW.